Friday, March 27, 2015

Where is Fernando Po?

On January 23 I wrote about native islander, Eliza Ella ("Miss Lizerella") Styron O'Neal (1890-1953), who never left the island in her entire 63 years (except to venture a mile or so out into Pamlico Sound in a small boat).

That got me thinking about how things have changed, and how widely traveled present-day islanders are. I mentioned this to my daughter Amy, and she posted a question on Facebook for Ocracoke islanders: How many different countries have you lived in or visited?

At last count, there were 143 places, some of which I had never heard of (including Fernando Po)! They are listed below. I know some of them are territories of other countries (e.g. Anguilla), are actually parts of larger countries (e.g. the Galapagos Islands), have been altered (e.g. the Czech Republic is part of the former Czechoslovakia), are special regions (e.g. Hong Kong), or may no longer exist as separate countries (e.g. East Germany).

However, this list (literally, from A to Z) includes places in the spirit of Amy's question. I even wanted to include Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation in north central Montana, where I lived in the winter of 1968-1969, because it felt like a foreign country (or, more honestly, I felt like a foreigner in their country).

I know this is an incomplete list, but I think it's pretty impressive. Islanders, please leave a comment if we haven't included some place you have lived in or visited, and all readers, please leave a comment with suggestions for exotic places we might want to visit:
 
Andorra
Anguilla
Antarctica
Antigua
Argentina
Aruba
Australia
Austria
Bahamas
Barbados
Belgium
Belize
Bequia
Bermuda
Bonaire
Botswana
Brazil
Bulgaria
Cambodia
Cameroon
Canada
Cayman Islands
Chili
China
Columbia
Cozumel
Cuba
Croatia
Curacao
Czechoslovakia
Czech Republic
Denmark
Djibouti
Dominican Republic
East Germany
Ecuador
Egypt
El Salvador
England
Equatorial Guinea
Estonia
Ethiopia
Fernando Po
Fiji
Finland
France
French Polynesia
Galapagos Islands
Gambia
Germany
Ghana
Goa
Greece
Greenland
Grenada
Guam
Guatemala
Haiti
Hawaii (before it was a state)
Holland
Honduras
Hong Kong
Hungary
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Johnston Atoll
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kwajalein Island
Lebanon
Liechtenstein
Lesotho
Luxemburg
Macao
Majorca
Malaysia
Martinique
Mexico
Monaco
Montserrat
Morocco
Namibia
Netherlands
Nevis
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Nigeria
Norway
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Puerto Rico
Rhodesia
Romania
Russia
Saba
Saipan
San Marino
Saudi Arabia
Scotland
Senegal
Siberia
Sicily
Singapore
South Africa
South Korea
South Viet Nam
Spain
Sri Lanka
St. Kitts
St. Lucia
St. Maarten
St. Thomas
St. Vincent
Ste. Barthe
Sudan
Sweden
Switzerland
Taiwan
Tanganyika
Thailand
Tortola
Trinidad
Turkey
Turks & Caicos
Uganda
Ukraine
United Arab Emirates
Uruguay
Uzbekistan
Venezuela
Virgin Islands
Wales
Yemen
Zanzibar

Happy travels to all! And we hope Ocracoke is always on your list of favorite places to visit or to call home.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of the Ocracoke Orgy. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032115.htm.

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Two Quotations...

...from Ann Ehringhaus' 1988 book, Ocracoke Portrait:

"I don't think Ocracoke is a haven for any one group of people. I think it's a haven for a wide, wide variety of people. I don't think there is one character that typifies Ocracoke. I think for a small town it's probably the most diversified community I've ever been in."

"Someone asked me if Ocracoke was like a penal colony. I had to laugh. Utopia it's not, but there is a great sense of community here. I feel like moving to Ocracoke has been my reward. This is where I want to be."

If you haven't already read Ann's book, I encourage you to get a copy, and enjoy her iconic photos & insightful comments by islanders and visitors.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of the Ocracoke Orgy. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032115.htm.




Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Stunning Photos

In January I posted information and a link to Garrett Fisher's aerial photos of the Outer Banks. Earlier this month Garrett flew over Hatteras and Ocracoke again. He has posted another gallery of stunning photos of shoals and sand bars in the inlets, tidal flows, currents, soundside marshes, and ocean beaches.

Oregon Inlet by Garrett Fisher



















Follow this link to view 30 more photos that Garret took on March 8, 2015: http://garrettfisher.me/flight-nc-obx-to-charlotte/.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of the Ocracoke Orgy. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032115.htm.

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

The Ocracoke Orgy

Well, if that didn't get your attention, I don't know what will!

That's the title of our latest Ocracoke Newsletter...The Ocracoke Orgy. If you want to know more (there is even a picture), just click on this link: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032115.htm.

Monday, March 23, 2015

Answer to Puzzle

Jeff and Lou Ann are correct. The answer to Friday's puzzle is the fourth-order Fresnel Lens installed in the Ocracoke Lighthouse. In 1822 French scientist and inventor, Augustin Fresnel, discovered a method, using glass prisms and bull's eyes, to focus and magnify a beam of light. His invention revolutionized lighthouses. This is a drawing of the first-order Fresnel Lens that was installed in the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse in 1854:




















Although the Ocracoke Lighthouse was built in 1823, it was originally fitted with a reflective system. Not until several decades later did the United States Lighthouse Board convert to the more efficient Fresnel Lenses. A fourth-order lens was installed in Ocracoke's tower in 1854. Below are two photos by Eakin Howard. The second photo was taken from the bottom, looking into the interior of the lens. It shows the electric lamp changer.





















You can read more about the Fresnel Lens here: http://www.nps.gov/caha/learn/historyculture/fresnellens.htm, on various other Internet sites, or in Theresa Levitt's excellent 2013 book, A Short Bright Flash, Augustin Fresnel and the Birth of the Modern Lighthouse.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is research into the origin of the Ocracoke Island Wahab family. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm

Friday, March 20, 2015

A Puzzle

In 1862, the Illustrated Times of London had this comment about a marvelous invention that had gained popularity around the world:

"[It] is a manufacture from which emanate the useful and the beautiful as kindred and inseparable spirits; where the highest faculties of the mind and deepest sympathies of the heart have equal place; and where the genius of humanity inspires and blesses the genius of science."

The object of the Times' encomium is a remarkable artifact, an example of which can be found on Ocracoke Island today, although very few people have ever laid eyes on it.  Can you guess what the Times was referring to?

I will publish the answer on Monday.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is research into the origin of the Ocracoke Island Wahab family. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm


Thursday, March 19, 2015

Three Early Shipwreck Reports

These reports are transcribed exactly as published in the Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania). The long s (ſ) was in common usage in the mid-eighteenth century 

Tuesday, January 16, 1753: "Capt. Freeman from North Carolina, as he came out the 23d of December laſt, heard at Ocracock Bar, That two Sloops were caſt away between that Place and Cape Hatteras; that it was ſuppoſed they were New-England Men, by ſome Cyder and Earthen Ware being found on board; but that the People had got aſhore, and were gone up to the North County; Capt. Freeman ſaw one of [t]he Sloops, and fays, they run aſhore but a few Days before."

Thursday, April 5, 1753: "We have Intelligence, by a Veſſel in five Days from North-Carolina, That a Boſton Ship, bound into Ocracock, was caſt away the Beginning of March Laſt, near the Inlet, and the Veſſel and Part of the Cargo loft."

Thursday, June 6, 1754: "Capt Jackſon, from Edenton in North Carolina, in three Weeks, ſays, That fourteen Days ago, a Schooner, bound from Antigua, called the Queen Caroline, John Sawyer Maſter, was caſt away on Ocracock Bar; and that the Crew were ſaved, but the Veſſel and Cargo entirely loſt."

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is research into the origin of the Ocracoke Island Wahab family. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm.